Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2016 Dec;207:121-124. doi: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2016.10.016. Epub 2016 Nov 2.

Coital pain in the elderly: could a low dose estriol gel thrill the vulvar vestibule?

Author information

1
Lower Genital Tract Disease Unit, V. Buzzi Hospital-University of Milan, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: filippomurina@tin.it.
2
Gynaecology Unit, San Raffaele Resnati Hospital, Milan, Italy.
3
Lower Genital Tract Disease Unit, V. Buzzi Hospital-University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the application of 0.005% estriol gel to the vulvar vestibule in the management of postmenopausal dyspareunia.

STUDY DESIGN:

Postmenopausal women with dyspareunia were enrolled in this study. Patients were instructed to use a fingertip to apply 0.25g of vaginal gel containing 25μg of estriol to the vulvar vestibule daily for three weeks and then twice weekly for up to 12 weeks.

RESULTS:

Assessment of symptoms (dyspareunia and cotton swab test) and signs of vestibular atrophy were performed, and changes between baseline and weeks 3 and 12 were assessed. Adverse events were recorded. A total of 63 women were included. Of the 63, 59 (93.6%) completed the 12-week treatment period, and four dropped out for vestibular burning. Dyspareunia improved or was cured (score ≤1) by week 12 in 81.4% of patients. The patients also showed a statistically significant reduction in vestibular atrophy and cotton swab test at the end of treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Application of 0.005% estriol gel to the vulvar vestibule is effective in correcting menopausal coital pain. This suggests that reduction in sensory vestibular innervation sensitivity is likely to play a pivotal role in the relief of dyspareunia. One limitation of this study is the limited follow-up, but the therapy may be continued for as long as the patients are distressed by their symptoms without estrogen intervention.

KEYWORDS:

Dyspareunia; Estriol; Gel; Postmenopausal; Vestibulodynia; Vulvodynia

PMID:
27838536
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejogrb.2016.10.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center