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Ann Oncol. 2017 Feb 1;28(2):408-414. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdw618.

Dietary acrylamide and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4).

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan.
2
Unit of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Bioinformatics, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco.
4
Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, USA.
5
Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia.
6
Department of Neurosciences, Psychology, Drug Research and Children's Health, University of Florence, Florence.
7
Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Aviano (PN), Italy.
8
School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.
9
Department of Epidemiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Public Health, New Orleans, USA.
10
Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy.
11
Department of Epidemiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock.
12
The Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, USA.
13
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

Background:

Occupational exposure to acrylamide was associated with excess mortality from pancreatic cancer, though in the absence of dose-risk relationship. Few epidemiological studies have examined the association between acrylamide from diet and pancreatic cancer risk.

Patients and methods:

We considered this issue in a combined set of 1975 cases of pancreatic cancer and 4239 controls enrolled in six studies of the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). We calculated pooled odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) by estimating study-specific ORs through multivariate unconditional logistic regression models and pooling the obtained estimates using random-effects models.

Results:

Compared with the lowest level of estimated dietary acrylamide intake, the pooled ORs were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.19) for the second, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.71-1.16) for the third, and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.66-1.28) for the fourth (highest) quartile of intake. For an increase of 10 µg/day of acrylamide intake, the pooled OR was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.87-1.06), with heterogeneity between estimates (I2 = 67%). Results were similar across various subgroups, and were confirmed when using a one-stage modelling approach.

Conclusions:

This PanC4 pooled-analysis found no association between dietary acrylamide and pancreatic cancer.

KEYWORDS:

acrylamide; case–control studies; pancreatic neoplasms; pooled-analysis; risk factors

PMID:
27836886
DOI:
10.1093/annonc/mdw618
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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