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J Adolesc Health. 2017 Jan;60(1):33-37. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.08.028. Epub 2016 Nov 8.

Controlled Pilot Study of High-Impact Low-Frequency Exercise on Bone Loss and Vital-Sign Stabilization in Adolescents With Eating Disorders.

Author information

1
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: susannepkmartin@gmail.com.
2
Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California.
3
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) face an increased lifetime risk of bone fragility. This randomized controlled study examined the efficacy and safety of a high-impact activity program on markers of bone turnover and stabilization of vital signs (VSS).

METHODS:

Forty-one hospitalized adolescents with AN were randomly assigned to routine care or routine care plus 20 jumps twice daily. Bone markers were measured at baseline days 1-3 (T1), days 4-6 (T2), and days 7-9 (T3). The primary outcome was change in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) at T3 adjusted for BSAP and % median body mass index at T1. Secondary outcomes were serum N-telopeptide (NTX) and osteocalcin at T3. Safety was determined by comparing weight gain, time to VSS and length of stay for each group.

RESULTS:

BSAP, NTX, or osteocalcin did not differ between groups at baseline or at T3. BSAP and NTX at T3 were not associated with group of enrollment or % median body mass index. VSS was significantly reduced in the intervention group compared with the control group (11.6 ± 5.7 days vs. 17 ± 10.5 days, p = .049). There was no significant difference in weight gain or length of stay between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Twice-daily jumping activity failed to influence markers of bone turnover in adolescents with AN but was well tolerated, shortened time to vital-sign stabilization and did not slow weight gain.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Biomarkers of bone turnover; Eating disorders; High-impact low-frequency exercise

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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