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Elife. 2016 Nov 11;5. pii: e20522. doi: 10.7554/eLife.20522.

A complete toolset for the study of Ustilago bromivora and Brachypodium sp. as a fungal-temperate grass pathosystem.

Author information

1
Gregor Mendel Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna Biocenter, Vienna, Austria.
2
Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg, Germany.
3
Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany.
4
Vienna Biocenter Core Facilities GmbH, Vienna, Austria.
5
Leibniz-Institut für Pflanzengenetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung, Gatersleben, Germany.
6
DOE Joint Genome Institute, California, United States.
7
INRA UMR BIOGER, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, Thiverval-Grignon, France.
8
Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
9
Department of Genome-oriented Bioinformatics, Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München, Freising, Germany.

Abstract

Due to their economic relevance, the study of plant pathogen interactions is of importance. However, elucidating these interactions and their underlying molecular mechanisms remains challenging since both host and pathogen need to be fully genetically accessible organisms. Here we present milestones in the establishment of a new biotrophic model pathosystem: Ustilago bromivora and Brachypodium sp. We provide a complete toolset, including an annotated fungal genome and methods for genetic manipulation of the fungus and its host plant. This toolset will enable researchers to easily study biotrophic interactions at the molecular level on both the pathogen and the host side. Moreover, our research on the fungal life cycle revealed a mating type bias phenomenon. U. bromivora harbors a haplo-lethal allele that is linked to one mating type region. As a result, the identified mating type bias strongly promotes inbreeding, which we consider to be a potential speciation driver.

KEYWORDS:

Brachypodium distachyon; Ustilago bromivora; biotrophic interaction; effector; grass; infectious disease; microbiology; plant biology; plant pathogen

PMID:
27835569
PMCID:
PMC5106213
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.20522
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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