Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Brain Inj. 2016;30(12):1491-1500.

PTSD confounds detection of compromised cerebral white matter integrity in military veterans reporting a history of mild traumatic brain injury.

Author information

1
a Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System , Minneapolis , MN , USA.
2
b Department of Psychiatry , University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , MN , USA.
3
c Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of St. Thomas , Minneapolis , MN , USA.
4
d Department of Psychology , University of Minnesota , Minneapolis , MN , USA.

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

Based on high comorbidity between mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among deployed military service members, this study tested the hypothesis that the presence of PTSD disrupts the association between mTBI and lower white matter integrity identified in non-military samples. Research design/Methods and procedures: In a sample of 124 recent veterans with a range of mTBI and PTSD history, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics of white matter integrity in 20 regions were compared using multiple mTBI and PTSD contrasts.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

Civilian mTBI was associated with lower global anisotropy, higher global diffusivity and higher diffusivity in 17 of 20 regions. No main effects of deployment mTBI were observed, but an interaction between deployment mTBI and lifetime PTSD on FA was observed globally and in 10 regions. Impact and blast mTBI demonstrated similar but weaker effects to those of civilian and deployment mTBI, respectively, demonstrating the context of mTBI is more relevant to white matter integrity than mechanism of injury.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, a main effect of civilian mTBI indicates long-term disruptions to white matter are likely present, while the interaction between deployment mTBI and PTSD indicates that a history of PTSD alters this relationship.

KEYWORDS:

DTI; PTSD; concussion; mTBI; military; white matter

PMID:
27834537
DOI:
10.1080/02699052.2016.1219057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center