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J Autism Dev Disord. 2017 Feb;47(2):285-296. doi: 10.1007/s10803-016-2951-x.

Factors Associated with Self-Injurious Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Findings from Two Large National Samples.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Colorado-Anschutz Medical Campus, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. Yxo2@cdc.gov.
2
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 4770 Buford Hwy, MS E-86, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA. Yxo2@cdc.gov.
3
Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Colorado-Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, University of Colorado-Anschutz Medical Campus, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado-Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA.
7
College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 19102, USA.
8
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.
9
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 4770 Buford Hwy, MS E-86, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA.
10
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, 53726, USA.
11
Child Development Unit, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.

Abstract

In this study, we explored potential associations among self-injurious behaviors (SIB) and a diverse group of protective and risk factors in children with autism spectrum disorder from two databases: Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and the Autism Speaks-Autism Treatment Network (AS-ATN). The presence of SIB was determined from children's records in ADDM and a parent questionnaire in AS-ATN. We used multiple imputation to account for missing data and a non-linear mixed model with site as a random effect to test for associations. Despite differences between the two databases, similar associations were found; SIB were associated with developmental, behavioral, and somatic factors. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to possible etiology, future longitudinal studies, and clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Autism; Autism spectrum disorder; Challenging behaviors; Children; Maladaptive behaviors; Self-injurious behaviors

PMID:
27830427
PMCID:
PMC5392776
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-016-2951-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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