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J Biomed Opt. 2016 Nov 1;21(11):114001. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.21.11.114001.

Separating melanin from hemodynamics in nevi using multimode hyperspectral dermoscopy and spatial frequency domain spectroscopy.

Author information

1
Spectral Molecular Imaging Inc., 13412 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 250, Sherman Oaks, California 91423, United States.
2
University of California, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92612, United States.
3
Spectral Molecular Imaging Inc., 13412 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 250, Sherman Oaks, California 91423, United StatescUniversity of Southern California, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1042 Downey Way, Los Angeles, California 90089, United States.

Abstract

Changes in the pattern and distribution of both melanocytes (pigment producing) and vasculature (hemoglobin containing) are important in distinguishing melanocytic proliferations. The ability to accurately measure melanin distribution at different depths and to distinguish it from hemoglobin is clearly important when assessing pigmented lesions (benign versus malignant). We have developed a multimode hyperspectral dermoscope (SkinSpect™) able to more accurately image both melanin and hemoglobin distribution in skin. SkinSpect uses both hyperspectral and polarization-sensitive measurements. SkinSpect’s higher accuracy has been obtained by correcting for the effect of melanin absorption on hemoglobin absorption in measurements of melanocytic nevi. In vivo human skin pigmented nevi (N=20) were evaluated with the SkinSpect, and measured melanin and hemoglobin concentrations were compared with spatial frequency domain spectroscopy (SFDS) measurements. We confirm that both systems show low correlation of hemoglobin concentrations with regions containing different melanin concentrations (R=0.13 for SFDS, R=0.07 for SkinSpect).

PMID:
27830262
PMCID:
PMC5103103
DOI:
10.1117/1.JBO.21.11.114001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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