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Am J Transl Res. 2016 Oct 15;8(10):4464-4471. eCollection 2016.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is highly associated with giant idiopathic esophageal ulcers in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Fudan University Shanghai, China.
2
Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical School Shanghai, China.
3
Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, New York, USA.
4
Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China.
5
Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jilin University Jilin, China.
6
Department of Hepatology, Tianjing Second People's Hospital Tianjing, China.
7
Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, Fudan UniversityShanghai, China; Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical UniversityWenzhou, Zhejiang, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to determine whether the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exists in giant idiopathic esophageal ulcers in the patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

METHODS:

16 AIDS patients with a primary complaint of epigastric discomfort were examined by gastroscopy. Multiple and giant esophageal ulcers were biopsied and analyzed with pathology staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the potential pathogenic microorganisms, including HIV, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses (HSV).

RESULTS:

HIV was detected in ulcer samples from 12 out of these 16 patients. Ulcers in 2 patients were infected with CMV and ulcers in another 2 patients were found HSV positive. No obvious cancerous pathological changes were found in these multiple giant esophageal ulcer specimens.

CONCLUSION:

HIV may be one of the major causative agents of multiple benign giant esophageal ulcers in AIDS patients.

KEYWORDS:

AIDS; CMV; HIV; HSV; endoscopy; esophageal ulcer

PMID:
27830031
PMCID:
PMC5095340

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