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BMC Infect Dis. 2016 Nov 9;16(1):662.

Role of Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) in local dengue epidemics in Taiwan.

Author information

1
Center for General Education, Aletheia University, New Taipei City, 25103, Taiwan, ROC. puijentsai@gmail.com.
2
Center for Diagnostics and Vaccine Development, Centers for Disease Control, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Aedes mosquitoes in Taiwan mainly comprise Aedes albopictus and Ae. aegypti. However, the species contributing to autochthonous dengue spread and the extent at which it occurs remain unclear. Thus, in this study, we spatially analyzed real data to determine spatial features related to local dengue incidence and mosquito density, particularly that of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti.

METHODS:

We used bivariate Moran's I statistic and geographically weighted regression (GWR) spatial methods to analyze the globally spatial dependence and locally regressed relationship between (1) imported dengue incidences and Breteau indices (BIs) of Ae. albopictus, (2) imported dengue incidences and BI of Ae. aegypti, (3) autochthonous dengue incidences and BI of Ae. albopictus, (4) autochthonous dengue incidences and BI of Ae. aegypti, (5) all dengue incidences and BI of Ae. albopictus, (6) all dengue incidences and BI of Ae. aegypti, (7) BI of Ae. albopictus and human population density, and (8) BI of Ae. aegypti and human population density in 348 townships in Taiwan.

RESULTS:

In the GWR models, regression coefficients of spatially regressed relationships between the incidence of autochthonous dengue and vector density of Ae. aegypti were significant and positive in most townships in Taiwan. However, Ae. albopictus had significant but negative regression coefficients in clusters of dengue epidemics. In the global bivariate Moran's index, spatial dependence between the incidence of autochthonous dengue and vector density of Ae. aegypti was significant and exhibited positive correlation in Taiwan (bivariate Moran's index = 0.51). However, Ae. albopictus exhibited positively significant but low correlation (bivariate Moran's index = 0.06). Similar results were observed in the two spatial methods between all dengue incidences and Aedes mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus). The regression coefficients of spatially regressed relationships between imported dengue cases and Aedes mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus) were significant in 348 townships in Taiwan. The results indicated that local Aedes mosquitoes do not contribute to the dengue incidence of imported cases. The density of Ae. aegypti positively correlated with the density of human population. By contrast, the density of Ae. albopictus negatively correlated with the density of human population in the areas of southern Taiwan. The results indicated that Ae. aegypti has more opportunities for human-mosquito contact in dengue endemic areas in southern Taiwan.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ae. aegypti, but not Ae. albopictus, and human population density in southern Taiwan are closely associated with an increased risk of autochthonous dengue incidence.

KEYWORDS:

Aedes mosquitoes; Breteau index; Dengue fever; Geographically weighted regression; Global bivariate Moran’s I

PMID:
27829399
PMCID:
PMC5103501
DOI:
10.1186/s12879-016-2002-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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