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Cell Rep. 2016 Nov 8;17(7):1739-1746. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.10.033.

Piezo1 Channels Are Inherently Mechanosensitive.

Author information

1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: ruhma@scripps.edu.
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
3
Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Lowy Packer Building, 405 Liverpool Street, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia.
4
Section of Neurobiology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
5
Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Lowy Packer Building, 405 Liverpool Street, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia.

Abstract

The conversion of mechanical force to chemical signals is critical for many biological processes, including the senses of touch, pain, and hearing. Mechanosensitive ion channels play a key role in sensing the mechanical stimuli experienced by various cell types and are present in organisms from bacteria to mammals. Bacterial mechanosensitive channels are characterized thoroughly, but less is known about their counterparts in vertebrates. Piezos have been recently established as ion channels required for mechanotransduction in disparate cell types in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of Piezos in heterologous cells gives rise to large mechanically activated currents; however, it is unclear whether Piezos are inherently mechanosensitive or rely on alternate cellular components to sense mechanical stimuli. Here, we show that mechanical perturbations of the lipid bilayer alone are sufficient to activate Piezo channels, illustrating their innate ability as molecular force transducers.

KEYWORDS:

Piezo1; lipid bilayer; mechanosensitive ion channel; mechanotransduction; membrane asymmetry; membrane tension

PMID:
27829145
PMCID:
PMC5129625
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.10.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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