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PLoS One. 2016 Nov 8;11(11):e0165652. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0165652. eCollection 2016.

Fatigue in Type 2 Diabetes: Impact on Quality of Life and Predictors.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, The Sage Colleges, Troy, New York, United States of America.
2
School of Nursing, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, United States of America.
3
Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, United States of America.
4
Department of Physical Therapy, Stockton University, Galloway, New Jersey, United States of America.

Abstract

Fatigue is a persistent symptom, impacting quality of life (QoL) and functional status in people with type 2 diabetes, yet the symptom of fatigue has not been fully explored. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fatigue, QoL functional status and to investigate the predictors of fatigue. These possible predictors included body mass index (BMI), Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), sleep quality, pain, number of complications from diabetes, years since diagnosis and depression. Forty-eight individuals with type 2 diabetes (22 females, 26 males; 59.66±7.24 years of age; 10.45 ±7.38 years since diagnosis) participated in the study. Fatigue was assessed by using Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20). Other outcomes included: QoL (Audit of Diabetes Dependent QoL), and functional status (6 minute walk test), BMI, HbA1c, sleep (Pittsburg sleep quality index, PSQI), pain (Visual Analog Scale), number of complications, years since diagnosis, and depression (Beck's depression Inventory-2). The Pearson correlation analysis followed by multivariable linear regression model was used. Fatigue was negatively related to quality of life and functional status. Multivariable linear regression analysis revealed sleep, pain and BMI as the independent predictors of fatigue signaling the presence of physiological (sleep, pain, BMI) phenomenon that could undermine health outcomes.

PMID:
27824886
PMCID:
PMC5100935
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0165652
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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