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Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Dec;128(6):1241-1247.

Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Self-Collected Cervicovaginal Swabs in Young Women in the United States Between 2003 and 2012.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, and the Department of Clinical Investigation, Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate whether there was a change in prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the United States correlated with the introduction of HPV vaccines in both vaccinated and unvaccinated women.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective review of prevalence data for women aged 18-29 years living in the United States using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which is an ongoing series of cross-sectional surveys. Participants provided responses to standardized questions and self-collected cervicovaginal swabs in which a Linear Array HPV Assay was used to determine HPV prevalence. A total of 783 women from the prevaccine era (2003-2004) and 1,526 from the postvaccine era (2007-2012) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Among women aged 18-29 years, the prevalence of vaccine-type HPV declined among women receiving one or more doses of vaccine (P=.003): 10.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.1-13.8%) in the prevaccine era to 4.2% (95% CI 3.3-10.9%) in the postvaccine era. There was no change in prevalence of nonvaccine-type HPV among women receiving one or more doses of vaccine (P>.05). There was also no change in prevalence of vaccine-type HPV among unvaccinated women from the prevaccine era 10.1% (95% CI 7.1-13.8%) to 8.8% (95% CI 5.6-12.9%) in the postvaccine era (P=.4). Vaccine coverage increased to 31.5% of eligible women aged 18-29 years as of 2011-2012.

CONCLUSION:

Six years after introduction of HPV vaccination in the United States, there has been a decrease in the prevalence of vaccine-type HPV among women correlated with receiving one or more vaccine doses with no change in nonvaccine-type HPV. Furthermore, there has been no change in prevalence of vaccine-type HPV among unvaccinated women.

PMID:
27824760
DOI:
10.1097/AOG.0000000000001760
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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