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J Abnorm Psychol. 2016 Nov;125(8):1039-1052.

The structure of psychopathology in adolescence and its common personality and cognitive correlates.

Author information

1
Department of Psychoeducation, University of Montreal.
2
Department of Psychology, McGill University.
3
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University.
4
Institute of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Trinity College.
5
Department of Systems Neuroscience, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf.
6
Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University.
7
Neurospin, Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf.
9
Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont.
10
Imaging and Psychiatry (Unit 1000), Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM CEA), University Paris Sud.
11
Rotman Research Institute, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto.
12
Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto.
13
Department of Psychiatry, Technische Universität.
14
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge.
15
Department of Psychology, University College Dublin.
16
MRC Social, Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre.
17
Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital.

Abstract

The traditional view that mental disorders are distinct, categorical disorders has been challenged by evidence that disorders are highly comorbid and exist on a continuum (e.g., Caspi et al., 2014; Tackett et al., 2013). The first objective of this study was to use structural equation modeling to model the structure of psychopathology in an adolescent community-based sample (N = 2,144) including conduct disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders, substance use, anxiety, depression, phobias, and other emotional symptoms, assessed at 16 years. The second objective was to identify common personality and cognitive correlates of psychopathology, assessed at 14 years. Results showed that psychopathology at 16 years fit 2 bifactor models equally well: (a) a bifactor model, reflecting a general psychopathology factor, as well as specific externalizing (representing mainly substance misuse and low ADHD) and internalizing factors; and (b) a bifactor model with a general psychopathology factor and 3 specific externalizing (representing mainly ADHD and ODD), substance use and internalizing factors. The general psychopathology factor was related to high disinhibition/impulsivity, low agreeableness, high neuroticism and hopelessness, high delay-discounting, poor response inhibition and low performance IQ. Substance use was specifically related to high novelty-seeking, sensation-seeking, extraversion, high verbal IQ, and risk-taking. Internalizing psychopathology was specifically related to high neuroticism, hopelessness and anxiety-sensitivity, low novelty-seeking and extraversion, and an attentional bias toward negatively valenced verbal stimuli. Findings reveal several nonspecific or transdiagnostic personality and cognitive factors that may be targeted in new interventions to potentially prevent the development of multiple psychopathologies. (PsycINFO Database Record.

PMID:
27819466
PMCID:
PMC5098414
DOI:
10.1037/abn0000193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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