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J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017 Jan - Feb;5(1):171-175.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.jaip.2016.08.013. Epub 2016 Nov 3.

Increasing Emergency Department Visits for Anaphylaxis, 2005-2014.

Author information

1
Division of Allergic Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
3
Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
4
Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; OptumLabs, Cambridge, Mass.
5
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Electronic address: campbell.ronna@mayo.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening systemic allergic reaction. Studies suggest that the incidence of anaphylaxis is increasing; however, recent trends in emergency department (ED) visits for anaphylaxis in the United States have not been studied.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine trends in the incidence and rates of anaphylaxis-related ED visits from 2005 through 2014.

METHODS:

We retrospectively analyzed data from a national administrative claims database including commercially insured and Medicare Advantage patients. We identified all ED visits for anaphylaxis and calculated rates as number of anaphylaxis-related ED visits per 100,000 enrollees. Rates were compared over time and by age and trigger.

RESULTS:

During the 10-year time period, 56,212 ED visits for anaphylaxis were identified. The median (interquartile range) age was 36 (17-52 years) years, and 58% were female. Most cases (57%) were due to unspecified triggers, 27% were associated with food, 12% were medication related, and 4% were due to insect venom. The overall rate of anaphylaxis per 100,000 enrollees increased by 101%, from 14.2 in 2005 to 28.6 in 2014 (P < .001). Rates of ED visits for anaphylaxis increased in all age groups, but the greatest increase was in children aged 5 to 17 years (196% increase; P < .001). The rate of food-related anaphylaxis increased by 124% (P < .001), and the rate of medication-related anaphylaxis increased by 212% (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

ED visits for anaphylaxis increased between 2005 and 2014. Increases in ED visits were greatest among children.

KEYWORDS:

Anaphylaxis; Emergency department; Epidemiology; Time trends

PMID:
27818135
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaip.2016.08.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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