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Presse Med. 2017 Mar;46(2 Pt 1):165-171. doi: 10.1016/j.lpm.2016.07.025. Epub 2016 Nov 3.

[Thiamine (vitamin B1) treatment in patients with alcohol dependence].

[Article in French]

Author information

1
Centre hospitalier Sainte-Anne, université Paris 5, Descartes, service d'addictologie, 1, rue Cabanis, 75014 Paris, France. Electronic address: a.dervaux@ch-sainte-anne.fr.
2
Centre hospitalier Sainte-Anne, université Paris 5, Descartes, service d'addictologie, 1, rue Cabanis, 75014 Paris, France.

Abstract

Thiamine deficiency (vitamin B1) is common in patients with alcohol dependence. Cognitive impairments may be an early consequence of thiamine deficiency. Wernicke's encephalopathy is underdiagnosed and undertreated. In patients with established Wernicke's encephalopathy, parenteral thiamine 200-500mg three times a day should be given for 3-5 days, followed by oral thiamine 250-1000mg/day. In patients with suspected Wernicke's encephalopathy, parenteral thiamine 250-300mg should be given two times a day for 3-5 days, followed by oral thiamine 250-300mg/day. In patients at high risk of thiamine deficiency, parenteral thiamine 250-500mg/day should be given for 3-5 days, followed by oral thiamine 250-300mg/day. In patients at low risk (with uncomplicated alcohol dependence), oral thiamine 250-500mg/day should be given for 3-5 days, followed by oral thiamine 100-250mg/day.

PMID:
27818067
DOI:
10.1016/j.lpm.2016.07.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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