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Am J Surg. 2017 Jan;213(1):24-29. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2016.09.058. Epub 2016 Oct 8.

The impact of surgical hand antisepsis technique on surgical site infection.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, VA Boston Healthcare System, 1400 VFW Parkway, West Roxbury, MA 02132, USA; Department of Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02110, USA. Electronic address: brad.oriel@va.gov.
2
Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research (CHOIR), VA Boston Healthcare System, 150 South Huntington Avenue, Building 9, Boston, MA 02130, USA. Electronic address: qi.chen2@va.gov.
3
Department of Surgery, VA Boston Healthcare System, 1400 VFW Parkway, West Roxbury, MA 02132, USA; Department of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: kamal.itani@va.gov.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Limited evidence exists regarding the effect on superficial and deep incisional surgical site infections (SDSSIs) of alcohol-based hand rubs (ABR) versus traditional aqueous surgical scrubs (TSS). User preferences and practice are unknown.

METHODS:

A retrospective cohort study examining SDSSIs using VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program cases before ABR implementation (2007-2009, TSS group) and after (2013-2014, ABR group). A descriptive survey.

RESULTS:

SDSSI rates were 1.8% and 1.5% for TSS (n=4051) and ABR (n=2293), respectively (p=0.31). The adjusted odds of SDSSI using ABR was not significant (OR 0.82; 95% CI, 0.51-1.32). Greatest SDSSI risk was from preoperative radiotherapy (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.14-6.78), general surgery (OR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.30-4.39) and preoperative smoking (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.02-2.44). Of 95 surveys included, 52% favored ABR. Although 95% self-reported correct product application, improper duration was revealed in both groups (TSS 18% and ABR 10%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Implementation of an ABR for use in surgical hand antisepsis did not alter SDSSI rates. Improving product knowledge and compliance may improve SSI rates.

KEYWORDS:

Hand hygiene; Surgical hand antisepsis; Surgical rub; Surgical scrub; Surgical site infection

PMID:
27817826
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2016.09.058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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