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Cell. 2016 Nov 3;167(4):915-932. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.10.027.

The Central Nervous System and the Gut Microbiome.

Author information

1
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. Electronic address: gsharon@caltech.edu.
2
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.
3
Program in Neurobehavioral Genetics, Semel Institute, and Program in Neurogenetics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Center for Autism Treatment and Research, Semel Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
4
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. Electronic address: sarkis@caltech.edu.

Abstract

Neurodevelopment is a complex process governed by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals. While historically studied by researching the brain, inputs from the periphery impact many neurological conditions. Indeed, emerging data suggest communication between the gut and the brain in anxiety, depression, cognition, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The development of a healthy, functional brain depends on key pre- and post-natal events that integrate environmental cues, such as molecular signals from the gut. These cues largely originate from the microbiome, the consortium of symbiotic bacteria that reside within all animals. Research over the past few years reveals that the gut microbiome plays a role in basic neurogenerative processes such as the formation of the blood-brain barrier, myelination, neurogenesis, and microglia maturation and also modulates many aspects of animal behavior. Herein, we discuss the biological intersection of neurodevelopment and the microbiome and explore the hypothesis that gut bacteria are integral contributors to development and function of the nervous system and to the balance between mental health and disease.

PMID:
27814521
PMCID:
PMC5127403
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.10.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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