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J Athl Train. 2016 Sep;51(9):682-687. Epub 2016 Nov 4.

Altered Vertical Ground Reaction Forces in Participants With Chronic Ankle Instability While Running.

Author information

1
School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis.
2
School of Applied Health Sciences and Wellness, Ohio University, Athens.
3
School of Public Health, University of Evansville, IN.
4
School of Public Health, Indiana University, Bloomington.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Altered gait kinetics may increase the risk of long-term injuries in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Vertical ground reaction forces (vGRFs) can provide insight into how body loading is altered.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the components of vGRFs while running in participants with or without CAI.

DESIGN:

Cohort study.

SETTING:

University biomechanics laboratory.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-four experienced, college-aged runners. Groups were categorized by the presence (CAI group) or absence (control group) of CAI through self-reported questionnaires.

INTERVENTION(S):

After a warm-up period, all participants ran on an instrumented treadmill for 5 minutes at 3.3 m/s. Data were collected during the last 30 seconds. Five continuous trials of heel-to-toe running were identified per participant and averaged for statistical analysis.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

The dependent variables were impact peak force (N/body weight [BW]), active peak force (N/BW), time to impact peak force (milliseconds), time to active peak force (milliseconds), and average loading rate ([N/BW]/s).

RESULTS:

A difference was found between groups (P = .002). The CAI group had higher impact peak forces (P = .001) and active peak forces (P = .002) compared with the control group. The CAI group also had an increased loading rate (P = .001) and a shorter time to reach the active peak force (P = .001) compared with the control group. No difference was seen between groups in the time to reach the impact peak force (P = .952).

CONCLUSIONS:

Participants with CAI produced altered vGRFs and loading rates while running. Altered loading rates could predispose individuals with CAI to stress-related injuries and repetitive sprains.

KEYWORDS:

biomechanics; gait; kinetics; stress fractures

PMID:
27813684
PMCID:
PMC5139784
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-51.11.11
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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