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Sci Rep. 2016 Nov 4;6:36017. doi: 10.1038/srep36017.

Circulating vitamin D in relation to cancer incidence and survival of the head and neck and oesophagus in the EPIC cohort.

Author information

1
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
2
Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway.
3
Section of Pharmacology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
4
Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
5
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
6
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway.
7
Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom.
8
School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
9
HuGeF Foundation, Turin, Italy.
10
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
11
The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
12
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy.
13
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civile M.P.Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy.
14
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
15
CPO-Piemonte and HuGeF Foundation, Torino Turin, Italy.
16
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
17
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
18
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
19
Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health team, Inserm, Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Villejuif, France.
20
Université Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France.
21
Institut Gustave-Roussy (IGR), Villejuif, France.
22
Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
23
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, Murcia, Spain.
24
Andalusian School of Public Health, Granada, Spain.
25
Catalan Institute of Oncology, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain.
26
Oviedo University, Oviedo, Spain.
27
Public Health Directorate Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.
28
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, Health Department of Basque Region, San Sebastian, Spain.
29
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
30
School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
31
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
32
WHO Collaborating Center for Food and Nutrition Policies, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
33
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.
34
Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece.
35
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany.
36
German Cancer Research Center DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany.
37
Nutritrional Research/Molecular Periodontology Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

Abstract

Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D play a role in pathogenesis and progression of cancer, but prospective data on head and neck cancer (HNC) and oesophagus cancer are limited. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study recruited 385,747 participants with blood samples between 1992 and 2000. This analysis includes 497 case-control pairs of the head and neck and oesophagus, as well as 443 additional controls. Circulating 25(OH)D3 were measured in pre-diagnostic samples and evaluated in relation to HNC and oesophagus cancer risk and post-diagnosis all-cause mortality. After controlling for risk factors, a doubling of 25(OH)D3 was associated with 30% lower odds of HNC (OR 0.70, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.56-0.88, Ptrend = 0.001). Subsequent analyses by anatomical sub-site indicated clear inverse associations with risk of larynx and hypopharynx cancer combined (OR 0.55, 95CI% 0.39-0.78) and oral cavity cancer (OR 0.60, 95CI% 0.42-0.87). Low 25(OH)D3 concentrations were also associated with higher risk of death from any cause among HNC cases. No clear association was seen with risk or survival for oesophageal cancer. Study participants with elevated circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D3 had decreased risk of HNC, as well as improved survival following diagnosis.

PMID:
27812016
PMCID:
PMC5095706
DOI:
10.1038/srep36017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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