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Br J Psychiatry. 2017 Feb;210(2):110-118. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.115.177139. Epub 2016 Nov 3.

Solving a weighty problem: systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition interventions in severe mental illness.

Author information

1
Scott B. Teasdale, BNutrDiet, Keeping the Body in Mind Program, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Bondi Junction, and School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney; Philip B. Ward, PhD, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Schizophrenia Research Unit, South Western Sydney Local Health District, and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; Simon Rosenbaum, PhD, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney; Katherine Samaras, MBBS, PhD, Department of Endocrinology, St Vincent's Hospital, and Diabetes and Obesity Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia; Brendon Stubbs, PhD, MCSP, Physiotherapy Department, South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust, London, and Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK Scott.Teasdale@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au.
2
Scott B. Teasdale, BNutrDiet, Keeping the Body in Mind Program, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Bondi Junction, and School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney; Philip B. Ward, PhD, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Schizophrenia Research Unit, South Western Sydney Local Health District, and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; Simon Rosenbaum, PhD, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney; Katherine Samaras, MBBS, PhD, Department of Endocrinology, St Vincent's Hospital, and Diabetes and Obesity Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia; Brendon Stubbs, PhD, MCSP, Physiotherapy Department, South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust, London, and Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nutrition interventions would appear fundamental for weight management and cardiometabolic risk reduction in people experiencing severe mental illness (SMI). Comprehensive evaluation of nutrition interventions is lacking.

AIMS:

To subject randomised controlled trials of nutrition interventions in people with SMI to systematic review and meta-analysis, and to measure anthropometric and biochemical parameters and nutritional intake.

METHOD:

An electronic database search identified trials with nutrition intervention components. Trials were pooled for meta-analysis. Meta-regression analyses were performed on anthropometric moderators.

RESULTS:

Interventions led to significant weight loss (19 studies), reduced body mass index (17 studies), decreased waist circumference (10 studies) and lower blood glucose levels (5 studies). Dietitian-led interventions (6 studies) and studies delivered at antipsychotic initiation (4 studies) had larger effect sizes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Evidence supports nutrition interventions as standard care in preventing and treating weight gain among people experiencing SMI.

PMID:
27810893
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.115.177139
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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