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Transl Res. 2017 Mar;181:108-120. doi: 10.1016/j.trsl.2016.10.001. Epub 2016 Oct 14.

Noncoding RNAs in the development, diagnosis, and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China.
3
Research and Development of Natural Products Key Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutics, Daqing Branch, Harbin Medical University, Daqing, China.
4
Department of Oncology, the Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China. Electronic address: wangguangyu@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn.
5
Department of Pathology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China. Electronic address: wtzpath@163.com.
6
Department of Pathology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China. Electronic address: lixiaobo@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

More than 90% of the human genome is actively transcribed, but less than 2% of the total genome encodes protein-coding RNA, and thus, noncoding RNA (ncRNA) is a major component of the human transcriptome. Recently, ncRNA was demonstrated to play important roles in multiple biological processes by directly or indirectly interfering with gene expression, and the dysregulation of ncRNA is associated with a variety of diseases, including cancer. In this review, we summarize the function and mechanism of miRNA, long intergenic ncRNA, and some other types of ncRNAs, such as small nucleolar RNA, circular ncRNA, pseudogene RNA, and even protein-coding mRNA, in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We also presented their clinical application in the diagnosis and prognosis of CRC. The summary of the current state of ncRNA in CRC will contribute to our understanding of the complex processes of CRC initiation and development and will help in the discovery of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for CRC diagnosis and treatment.

PMID:
27810413
DOI:
10.1016/j.trsl.2016.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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