Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Affect Disord. 2017 Jan 15;208:590-596. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.10.022. Epub 2016 Oct 23.

Negative mood-induction modulates default mode network resting-state functional connectivity in chronic depression.

Author information

1
MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. Electronic address: Fritz.Renner@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk.
2
Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands. School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands; Department of Cognitive Psychology, Institute for Psychology, University of Hamburg, Germany.
7
Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sad mood on default mode network (DMN) resting-state connectivity in persons with chronic major depressive disorder (cMDD).

METHODS:

Participants with a diagnosis of cMDD (n=18) and age, gender and education level matched participants without a diagnosis of depression (n=18) underwent a resting-state fMRI scan, before and after a sad mood induction. The posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) was used as a seed for DMN functional connectivity across the two resting-state measurements.

RESULTS:

Mood ratings decreased in both groups following the sad mood induction procedure. PCC connectivity with the parahippocampal gyrus, the superior temporal gyrus and the anterior inferior temporal cortex increased in cMDD patients following the sad mood induction, whereas it decreased in non-patient controls. PCC connectivity with the anterior prefrontal cortex and the precuneus decreased in cMDD patients following the sad mood induction, whereas it increased in non-patient controls.

LIMITATIONS:

Limitations of this study include the relatively small sample size and lack of a clinical control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings are in line with neurobiological models of depression suggesting that the observed changes in DMN connectivity following the sad mood induction might reflect a failure to exert cognitive control over negative memory retrieval in patients with cMDD.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic depression; Default mode network; Mood-induction; Posterior cingulate cortex; Resting state fMRI

PMID:
27810271
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2016.10.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center