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J Affect Disord. 2017 Jan 15;208:553-559. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.10.027. Epub 2016 Oct 24.

The association between insulin resistance and depression in the Korean general population.

Author information

1
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Samsung Seoul Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
3
Departments of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea.
4
Cancer Registration and Statistic Branch, National Cancer Control Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang, South Korea.
5
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Interdisciplinary Laboratory of Clinical Neurosciences (LINC), Department of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Brazil.
6
Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western London, Ontario, Canada.
7
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
8
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Medical Science, University of Tornoto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
9
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Medical Science, University of Tornoto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: Roger.McIntyre@uhn.ca.
10
Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Departments of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: jjy0501@naver.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies showed that the insulin resistance (IR) could be related to depression. However, this association is still equivocal in the general population. Herein, we aimed to investigate the association between IR and depressive symptoms in a large sample in South Korea.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was carried out for 165,443 Korean men and women who received a health checkup including various clinical parameters and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scales (CES-D). Subjects were stratified into subgroups by CES-D score, sex, age, and presence of diabetes. The odd ratios (ORs) for homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were compared between groups using multivariable logistic regression analyses.

RESULTS:

After adjusting covariates (e.g. smoking, family income, marriage state, unemployment status, average alcohol use, BMI, physical activity, systolic blood pressure, diabetes), increased IR was weakly associated with greater depressive symptoms (adjusted OR=1.01 [95% CI 1.0001-1.03]). Subgroup analysis revealed this association was statistically significant in females (adjusted OR=1.03, [95% CI 1.001-1.06]), non-diabetic group (adjusted OR=1.04, [95% CI 1.02-1.06]), and young participants under the age of thirty (adjusted OR=1.17, [95% CI 1.07-1.27]). But we couldn't find significant association in diabetic and middle to elderly participants.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates that there is a relationship between IR and depressive symptoms in the Korean general population. Results from this epidemiological study revealed that young adults and non-diabetic individuals with increased IR may be related with depressive symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

Cross-sectional study; Depression; General population; Insulin resistance

PMID:
27810270
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2016.10.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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