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Am J Emerg Med. 2017 Feb;35(2):234-239. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2016.10.055. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a prognostic marker in critically-ill septic patients.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon 200-701, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: taegunshin@skku.edu.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We evaluated the associations between the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) or changes in NLR and outcomes in septic patients.

METHODS:

Patients who met the criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock were categorized into five groups according to the quintile of initial NLR value. We defined two risk groups according to NLR value and changes in NLR during the first two days (defined as the persistently low NLR group and the persistently high NLR group). The primary outcome was 28-day mortality.

RESULTS:

A total of 1395 patients were included. The median initial NLR values from Quintile 1 to Quintile 5 were as follows: 0.2 (IQR [interquartile range], 0.1-0.7), 3.4 (IQR, 2.6-4.7), 8.6 (IQR, 7.1-9.9), 15.4 (IQR, 13.3-17.8), and 31.0 (IQR, 24.6-46.8), respectively. The 28-day mortality values for the same groups were as follows: 24.4%, 12.2%, 11.1%, 11.8%, and 16.1% (P<.01). Cox regression analysis showed that inclusion in Quintile 1 or Quintile 5 was a significant risk factor predicting 28-day mortality compared to Quintile 3 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-2.78) in Quintile 1; 1.67 (95% CI, 1.04-2.66) in Quintile 5). The analysis indicated that persistently low NLR (adjusted HR: 2.25, 95% CI, 1.63-3.11) and persistently high NLR (adjusted HR: 2.65, 95% CI, 1.64-4.29) were significant risk factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

In summary, the initial NLR measured at ED admission was independently associated with 28-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. In addition, change in NLR may prove to be a valuable prognostic marker.

KEYWORDS:

Lymphocytes; Neutrophils; Prognosis; Sepsis; Shock

PMID:
27806894
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajem.2016.10.055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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