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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2016 Nov 2;10(11):e0005110. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0005110. eCollection 2016 Nov.

Migrant Workers in Malaysia: Current Implications of Sociodemographic and Environmental Characteristics in the Transmission of Intestinal Parasitic Infections.

Author information

1
Institute of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
2
Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
3
Primary Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Teknologi Mara Sungai Buloh Campus, Selangor, Malaysia.
4
School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
5
School of Biological Sciences, University of London, Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom.

Abstract

A cross-sectional study of intestinal parasitic infections amongst migrant workers in Malaysia was conducted. A total of 388 workers were recruited from five sectors including manufacturing, construction, plantation, domestic and food services. The majority were recruited from Indonesia (n = 167, 43.3%), followed by Nepal (n = 81, 20.9%), Bangladesh (n = 70, 18%), India (n = 47, 12.1%) and Myanmar (n = 23, 5.9.2%). A total of four nematode species (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis and hookworms), one cestode (Hymenolepis nana) and three protozoan species (Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia sp. and Cryptosporidium spp.) were identified. High prevalence of infections with A. lumbricoides (43.3%) was recorded followed by hookworms (13.1%), E. histolytica/dispar (11.6%), Giardia sp. (10.8%), T. trichura (9.5%), Cryptosporodium spp. (3.1%), H. nana (1.8%) and E. vermicularis (0.5%). Infections were significantly influenced by socio-demographic (nationality), and environmental characteristics (length of working years in the country, employment sector and educational level). Up to 84.0% of migrant workers from Nepal and 83.0% from India were infected with intestinal parasites, with the ascarid nematode A. lumbricoides occurring in 72.8% of the Nepalese and 68.1% of the Indian population. In addition, workers with an employment history of less than a year or newly arrived in Malaysia were most likely to show high levels of infection as prevalence of workers infected with A. lumbricoides was reduced from 58.2% to 35.4% following a year's residence. These findings suggest that improvement is warranted in public health and should include mandatory medical screening upon entry into the country.

PMID:
27806046
PMCID:
PMC5091761
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0005110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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