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Psychol Health. 2017 Feb;32(2):186-203. Epub 2016 Nov 2.

A meta-analysis of children's self-reports of dietary intake.

Author information

1
a Department of Psychology , Claremont Graduate University , Claremont , CA , USA.
2
b Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine , UCLA , Los Angeles , CA , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Although research studies increasingly use children as primary reporters in dietary assessments, it is unclear how well children's self-reported intake correlates with independently validated reports of their intake; this meta-analysis assesses that correlation.

DESIGN:

Moderators of the correlation between self-reported and independently validated intake were predicted a priori: type of dietary intake assessment (24 h recall, food diary and food frequency questionnaires), validation measures, parental assistance and age. Online databases were searched for articles published from 1990 to 2014 that compared children's self-reports of dietary intake to validated observations of food intake in children age 4-16.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Summary effect size Pearson r between children's self-reported dietary intake and independently validated dietary intake were calculated.

RESULTS:

In k = 32 samples from 23 studies, a statistically significant correlation (r = .48, Z = 7.26, p < .001) was found between children's self-reported dietary intake and independently validated reports of dietary intake. Validation method (Q = 17.49, df = 2, p < .001) and parental assistance (Z = 2.03, p = .042) were significant moderators of this correlation. Self-report methodology (Q = 3.95, df = 2, p = .139) and age (Q = .02, p = .879) were not significant moderators of the distribution of effect sizes.

CONCLUSION:

Together, these results provide baseline information about children's recall in dietary intake assessments conducted with children as primary reporters.

KEYWORDS:

children; dietary intake; meta-analysis; self-reports; validation studies

PMID:
27804317
DOI:
10.1080/08870446.2016.1250274
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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