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J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2017 Feb;88(2):176-185. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2016-314601. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
2
Queen Square Brain Bank for Neurological Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
3
John van Geest Centre for Brain Repair, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
4
Centre for Neuroendocrinology, Royal Free Campus, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
5
Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.

Abstract

Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

KEYWORDS:

DIABETES MELLITUS; METABOLIC DISEASE; NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY; PARKINSON'S DISEASE; SLEEP DISORDERS

PMID:
27799297
DOI:
10.1136/jnnp-2016-314601
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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