Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Neurosci. 2016 Dec;19(12):1743-1749. doi: 10.1038/nn.4430. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

A viral strategy for targeting and manipulating interneurons across vertebrate species.

Author information

1
NYU Neuroscience Institute, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
2
Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Smilow Research Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
3
Center for Genomics &Systems Biology, New York University, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
4
McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
6
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
7
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, Washington, USA.
8
Systems Neurobiology Laboratories, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, California, USA.
9
Department of Functional Architecture and Development of Cerebral Cortex, Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, Jupiter, Florida, USA.
10
Department of Otolaryngology, Smilow Research Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
11
New York Stem Cell Foundation, New York, New York, USA.
12
NYU Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, New York, USA.
13
Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

A fundamental impediment to understanding the brain is the availability of inexpensive and robust methods for targeting and manipulating specific neuronal populations. The need to overcome this barrier is pressing because there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive and behavioral differences between mice and higher mammalian species in which it is difficult to specifically target and manipulate genetically defined functional cell types. In particular, it is unclear the degree to which insights from mouse models can shed light on the neural mechanisms that mediate cognitive functions in higher species, including humans. Here we describe a novel recombinant adeno-associated virus that restricts gene expression to GABAergic interneurons within the telencephalon. We demonstrate that the viral expression is specific and robust, allowing for morphological visualization, activity monitoring and functional manipulation of interneurons in both mice and non-genetically tractable species, thus opening the possibility to study GABAergic function in virtually any vertebrate species.

PMID:
27798629
PMCID:
PMC5348112
DOI:
10.1038/nn.4430
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center