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Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2017 Oct 1;32(10):1601-1608. doi: 10.1093/ndt/gfw368.

Anti-thymocyte globulins in kidney transplantation: focus on current indications and long-term immunological side effects.

Author information

1
Department of Nephrology, Dialysis, and Renal Transplantation, CHU Besançon, France.
2
UMR1098, Federation hospitalo-universitaire INCREASE, France.
3
Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Université de Franche-Comté, France.
4
Structure Fédérative de Recherche, SFR FED4234, France.
5
Department of Nephrology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Antithymocyte globulins (ATGs) are part of the immunosuppression arsenal currently used by clinicians to prevent or treat acute rejection in solid organ transplantation. ATG is a mixture of non-specific anti-lymphocyte immunoglobulins targeting not only T cell subsets but also several other immune and non-immune cells, rendering its precise immunoglobulin composition difficult to appreciate or to compare from one preparation to another. Furthermore, several mechanisms of action have been described. Taken together, this probably explains the efficacy and the side effects associated with this drug. Recent data suggest a long-term negative impact on allograft and patient outcomes, pointing out the need to better characterize the potential toxicity and the benefit-risk balance associated to this immunosuppressive therapy within large clinical trials.

KEYWORDS:

ATG; immune cell reconstitution; kidney allograft survival; serum sickness disease; transplant outcomes

PMID:
27798202
DOI:
10.1093/ndt/gfw368
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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