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J Arthroplasty. 2017 Mar;32(3):750-755. doi: 10.1016/j.arth.2016.09.004. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Trends in Utilization and Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopy in the United States Between 2005 and 2013.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota; Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota.
2
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota; Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota.
3
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota; Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota; Optum Labs, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
4
Division of Cardiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven Connecticut; Health Research & Educational Trust, Chicago Illinois.
5
Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas.
6
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Minnesota.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The utilization of hip arthroscopy continues to increase in the United States. The purpose of this study was to examine trends in hip arthroscopy procedures and outcomes.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective cohort study using Optum Labs Data Warehouse administrative claims data. The cohort comprised 10,042 privately insured enrollees aged 18-64 years who underwent a hip arthroscopy procedure between 2005 and 2013. Utilization trends were examined using age-specific, sex-specific, and calendar-year-specific hip arthroscopy rates. Outcomes were examined using the survival analysis methods and included subsequent hip arthroscopy and total hip arthroplasty (THA).

RESULTS:

Hip arthroscopy rates increased significantly over time from 3.6 per 100,000 in 2005 to 16.7 per 100,000 in 2013. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of subsequent hip arthroscopy and THA was 11% and 10%, respectively. In the subset of patients in whom laterality of the subsequent procedure could be determined, about half of the subsequent hip arthroscopy procedures (46%) and almost all of the THA procedures (94%) were on the same side. Decreasing age was significantly associated with the risk of subsequent arthroscopy (P < .01), whereas increasing age was significantly associated with the subsequent risk of THA (P < .01). The 5-year cumulative incidence of THA reached as high as 35% among individuals aged 55-64 years.

CONCLUSION:

The utilization of hip arthroscopy procedures increased dramatically over the last decade in the 18-64-year-old privately insured population, with the largest increase in younger age-groups. Future studies are warranted to understand the determinants of the large increase in utilization of hip arthroscopy and outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

administrative data; hip arthroplasty; hip arthroscopy; total hip arthroplasty; utilization

PMID:
27793498
DOI:
10.1016/j.arth.2016.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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