Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatr Obes. 2017 Dec;12(6):e51-e56. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12176. Epub 2016 Oct 28.

The association between dog ownership or dog walking and fitness or weight status in childhood.

Author information

1
Institute of Infection and Global Health, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Neston, UK.
2
School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Neston, UK.
3
Physical Activity, Exercise and Health Research Group, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.
4
Sport and Health Portfolio, College of Engineering Swansea University, Swansea, UK.
5
Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Neston, UK.
6
Institute of Psychology Health and Society, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, UK.
7
WALTHAM® Centre for Pet Nutrition, Leics, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Health benefits of dog walking are established in adults: dog owners are on average more physically active, and those walking their dogs regularly have lower weight status than those who do not. However, there has been little research on children.

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to examine the association between dog ownership or dog walking and childhood fitness or weight status.

METHODS:

A survey of pet ownership and involvement in dog walking was combined with fitness and weight status measurements of 1021 9 to 10-year-old children in the Liverpool SportsLinx study.

RESULTS:

We found little evidence to support that children who live with, or walk with, dogs are any fitter or less likely to be obese than those who do not.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is an important finding, as it suggests that the activity that children currently do with dogs is not sufficient enough to impact weight status or fitness.

KEYWORDS:

Dogs; paediatric obesity; physical fitness

PMID:
27793067
PMCID:
PMC5697616
DOI:
10.1111/ijpo.12176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center