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J Asthma. 2017 Aug;54(6):662-669. doi: 10.1080/02770903.2016.1253730. Epub 2016 Oct 28.

Early smoke exposure is associated with asthma and lung function deficits in adolescents.

Author information

1
a Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne , Melbourne , Australia.
2
b Center for Food and Allergy Research, Murdoch Children's Research Institute , Victoria , Australia.
3
c Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Royal Children's Hospital , Parkeville , Victoria , Australia.
4
d The department of Paedriatics , University of Melbourne , Parkeville , Victoria , Canada.
5
e School of Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester , Manchester , United Kingdom.
6
f Inflammation and Infection Research Centre, UNSW, and Respiratory Medicine, Prince of Wales Hospital , Sydney , Australia.
7
g Bergen Respiratory Research Group, Centre for International Health, University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
8
h Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital , Bergen , Norway.
9
i Respiratory Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital , Parkeville , Victoria , Australia.
10
j School of Public Health & Preventative Medicine, Monash University , Melbourne , Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Early life tobacco smoke exposure may influence asthma, lung function and lung function growth into adolescence. We aimed to determine the associations between perinatal smoke exposure and asthma and lung function up to 18 years of age.

METHODS:

We prospectively recorded perinatal parental smoking and measured respiratory outcomes at 12 and 18 years in the Melbourne Atopy Cohort Study (MACS), a longitudinal birth cohort. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the associations between perinatal smoke exposure and asthma at 12 (n = 370) and 18 years (n = 411). Multiple linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between perinatal smoking and: lung function (12 and 18 years) and lung function growth (between 12 and 18 years).

RESULTS:

At 18 years, girls exposed to parental smoking during the perinatal period had increased odds of asthma (OR: 3.45, 95%CI: 1.36, 8.77), reduced pre-bronchodilator Forced expiratory volume in one-second (FEV1) (-272 ml/s; -438, -107); FEV1/ forced vital capacity (FVC) (-0.038; -0.065, -0.010); mid expiratory flow (MEF25-75) (-430 ml/s; -798, -61), and reduced post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC (-0.028, -0.053, -0.004). No associations were found for boys (pre-bronchodilator FEV1 26ml/s; -202, 255; FEV1/FVC 0.018; -0.013, 0.049).

CONCLUSIONS:

Perinatal smoke may affect risk of asthma, reduce lung function and lung function growth in adolescence. Girls appear to be more susceptible than boys.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Tobacco abuse; paediatric; pregnancy; prevention

PMID:
27791435
DOI:
10.1080/02770903.2016.1253730
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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