Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Nov 1;113(44):12574-12579. Epub 2016 Oct 18.

Situating the default-mode network along a principal gradient of macroscale cortical organization.

Author information

1
Max Planck Research Group for Neuroanatomy & Connectivity, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig 04103, Germany; margulies@cbs.mpg.de.
2
McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139.
3
Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA 02115.
4
Department of Computational Neuroscience, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg 20246, Germany.
5
Max Planck Research Group for Neuroanatomy & Connectivity, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig 04103, Germany.
6
Neurocomputation and Neuroimaging Unit, Department of Education and Psychology, Free University of Berlin, Berlin 14195, Germany.
7
Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Computational Imaging Research Laboratory, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1090, Austria.
8
Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139.
9
McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4.
10
Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Jülich, Juelich 52428, Germany.
11
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf 40225, Germany.
12
Child Study Center, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016.
13
Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY 10962.
14
Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4.
15
Department of Psychology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom.
16
York Neuroimaging Centre, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Understanding how the structure of cognition arises from the topographical organization of the cortex is a primary goal in neuroscience. Previous work has described local functional gradients extending from perceptual and motor regions to cortical areas representing more abstract functions, but an overarching framework for the association between structure and function is still lacking. Here, we show that the principal gradient revealed by the decomposition of connectivity data in humans and the macaque monkey is anchored by, at one end, regions serving primary sensory/motor functions and at the other end, transmodal regions that, in humans, are known as the default-mode network (DMN). These DMN regions exhibit the greatest geodesic distance along the cortical surface-and are precisely equidistant-from primary sensory/motor morphological landmarks. The principal gradient also provides an organizing spatial framework for multiple large-scale networks and characterizes a spectrum from unimodal to heteromodal activity in a functional metaanalysis. Together, these observations provide a characterization of the topographical organization of cortex and indicate that the role of the DMN in cognition might arise from its position at one extreme of a hierarchy, allowing it to process transmodal information that is unrelated to immediate sensory input.

KEYWORDS:

connectivity; cortical organization; default-mode network; gradients; topography

Comment in

PMID:
27791099
PMCID:
PMC5098630
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1608282113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center