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Science. 2016 Oct 28;354(6311). pii: aaf3928. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Increased spatiotemporal resolution reveals highly dynamic dense tubular matrices in the peripheral ER.

Author information

1
Cell Biology Section, Neurogenetics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Bethesda, MD, USA. Department of Pharmacology, UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, London, UK.
2
Cell Biology and Metabolism Program, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, MD, USA. Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Ashburn, VA, USA.
3
Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Ashburn, VA, USA. National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
4
Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Ashburn, VA, USA.
5
Department of Pharmacology, UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, London, UK.
6
Cell Biology Section, Neurogenetics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Bethesda, MD, USA. blackstc@ninds.nih.gov lippincottschwartzj@janelia.hhmi.org.
7
Cell Biology and Metabolism Program, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, MD, USA. Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Ashburn, VA, USA. blackstc@ninds.nih.gov lippincottschwartzj@janelia.hhmi.org.

Abstract

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an expansive, membrane-enclosed organelle that plays crucial roles in numerous cellular functions. We used emerging superresolution imaging technologies to clarify the morphology and dynamics of the peripheral ER, which contacts and modulates most other intracellular organelles. Peripheral components of the ER have classically been described as comprising both tubules and flat sheets. We show that this system consists almost exclusively of tubules at varying densities, including structures that we term ER matrices. Conventional optical imaging technologies had led to misidentification of these structures as sheets because of the dense clustering of tubular junctions and a previously uncharacterized rapid form of ER motion. The existence of ER matrices explains previous confounding evidence that had indicated the occurrence of ER "sheet" proliferation after overexpression of tubular junction-forming proteins.

PMID:
27789813
PMCID:
PMC6528812
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaf3928
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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