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Science. 2016 Nov 18;354(6314):897-900. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Phytochrome B integrates light and temperature signals in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Fundación Instituto Leloir, Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquímicas de Buenos Aires-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), 1405 Buenos Aires, Argentina.
2
Institut für Biologie II, University of Freiburg, Schaenzlestrasse 1, D-79104 Freiburg.
3
Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1137, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA.
4
BIOSS Centre for Biological Signaling Studies, University of Freiburg, Schaenzlestrasse 18, 79104 Freiburg, Germany.
5
Sainsbury Laboratory, Cambridge University, 47 Bateman Street, Cambridge CB2 1LR, UK.
6
Fundación Instituto Leloir, Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquímicas de Buenos Aires-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), 1405 Buenos Aires, Argentina. casal@ifeva.edu.ar.
7
Instituto de Investigaciones Fisiológicas y Ecológicas a Vinculadas a la Agricultura (IFEVA), Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos Aires and CONICET, Avenida San Martín 4453, 1417 Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

Ambient temperature regulates many aspects of plant growth and development, but its sensors are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the phytochrome B (phyB) photoreceptor participates in temperature perception through its temperature-dependent reversion from the active Pfr state to the inactive Pr state. Increased rates of thermal reversion upon exposing Arabidopsis seedlings to warm environments reduce both the abundance of the biologically active Pfr-Pfr dimer pool of phyB and the size of the associated nuclear bodies, even in daylight. Mathematical analysis of stem growth for seedlings expressing wild-type phyB or thermally stable variants under various combinations of light and temperature revealed that phyB is physiologically responsive to both signals. We therefore propose that in addition to its photoreceptor functions, phyB is a temperature sensor in plants.

PMID:
27789798
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaf5656
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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