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AIDS Behav. 2017 Jun;21(6):1775-1781. doi: 10.1007/s10461-016-1593-5.

Pain and Risk Behaviors Among HIV-Infected Persons in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Author information

1
Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine and Harborview Hospital, 325 9th Ave, Box 359780, Seattle, WA, 98104, USA. tsuij@uw.edu.
2
Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Data Coordinating Center, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology of Addictions, First Pavlov State Medical University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
5
Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
6
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD, USA.
7
Department of Addictions, Bekhterev Research Psychoneurological Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia.
8
Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine/Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

We analyzed baseline data from an observational cohort of HIV-infected ART-naïve patients in St. Petersburg, Russia to explore whether pain was associated with HIV risk behaviors. The primary outcomes were (1) unprotected vaginal or anal sex in the past 90 days and (2) sharing of needles or equipment in the past month. Secondary outcomes included: use of alcohol prior to sex, current injection drug use, number of unprotected sex and sharing episodes, and days injected in the past month. The main independent variable was any past week pain. Multivariable regression models were fit for outcomes. After adjustment, the association with unprotected sex was of borderline significance (AOR = 2.06; 95 % CI 0.98-4.36, p = 0.058); there was no significant association between any past week pain and sharing of needles/equipment (AOR = 1.52; 95 % CI 0.65-3.59, p = 0.33). Participants with pain had higher odds of reporting alcohol use prior to sex (AOR = 2.42; 95 % CI 1.10-5.28, p = 0.03).

KEYWORDS:

HIV; Pain; Risk behaviors

PMID:
27787674
PMCID:
PMC5408303
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-016-1593-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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