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Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017 May;26(5):521-529. doi: 10.1007/s00787-016-0914-6. Epub 2016 Oct 26.

Perinatal complications, lipid peroxidation, and mental health problems in a large community pediatric sample.

Author information

1
National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Sao Paulo, Brazil. rodrigomansur71@uol.com.br.
2
PRISMA-Program for Recognition and Intervention in Individuals in At-Risk Mental Statem, Department of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil. rodrigomansur71@uol.com.br.
3
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit (MDPU), University Health Network, University of Toronto, 399 Bathurst Street, MP 9-325, Toronto, ON, M5T 2S8, Canada. rodrigomansur71@uol.com.br.
4
National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry for Children and Adolescents, CNPq, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
5
PRISMA-Program for Recognition and Intervention in Individuals in At-Risk Mental Statem, Department of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
7
Institute of Biomedical Research, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Translational Psychiatry, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, USA.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

Replicated evidence indicates that perinatal complications are associated with increased markers of oxidative stress and with mental health problems in children. However, there are fewer reports on the impact of perinatal complications in later phases of development. We aimed to investigate the estimated effects of perinatal complications on levels of lipid peroxidation and on psychopathology in children and adolescents. The study is part of the High Risk Cohort Study for Psychiatric Disorders; the population was composed by 554 students, 6-14 years of age. Serum levels of malondialdehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation, were measured by the TBARS method. A household interview with parents and caregivers was conducted and included inquiries about perinatal history, the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and parent's evaluation, using the Mini International Psychiatric Interview (MINI). We created a cumulative risk index, conceptualized as each individual's cumulative exposure to perinatal complications. Results indicate that perinatal complications were associated with higher levels of TBARS. After adjusting for age, gender, socio-economic status, CBCL total problems score, parental psychopathology, and childhood maltreatment, children exposed to 3 or more perinatal complications had an 26.9% (95% CI 9.9%, 46.6%) increase in TBARS levels, relative to the unexposed group. Exploratory mediation analysis indicated that TBARS levels partially mediated the association between perinatal complications and externalizing problems. In conclusion, an adverse intrauterine and/or early life environment, as proxied by the cumulative exposure to perinatal complications, was independently associated with higher levels of lipid peroxidation in children and adolescents.

KEYWORDS:

Adverse early life environment; Childhood; Lipid peroxidation; Oxidative stress; Perinatal complications; Psychopathology

PMID:
27785581
DOI:
10.1007/s00787-016-0914-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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