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Cell Rep. 2016 Oct 25;17(5):1276-1288. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.10.002.

Evidence for Two Independent Factors that Modify Brain Networks to Meet Task Goals.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: cgratton@wustl.edu.
2
Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
3
VISN 17 Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans, Waco, TX 76711, USA; Center for Vital Longevity, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75235, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Radiology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

Abstract

Humans easily and flexibly complete a wide variety of tasks. To accomplish this feat, the brain appears to subtly adjust stable brain networks. Here, we investigate what regional factors underlie these modifications, asking whether networks are either altered at (1) regions activated by a given task or (2) hubs that interconnect different networks. We used fMRI "functional connectivity" (FC) to compare networks during rest and three distinct tasks requiring semantic judgments, mental rotation, and visual coherence. We found that network modifications during these tasks were independently associated with both regional activation and network hubs. Furthermore, active and hub regions were associated with distinct patterns of network modification (differing in their localization, topography of FC changes, and variability across tasks), with activated hubs exhibiting patterns consistent with task control. These findings indicate that task goals modify brain networks through two separate processes linked to local brain function and network hubs.

KEYWORDS:

brain networks; fMRI; graph theory; task control

PMID:
27783943
PMCID:
PMC5123792
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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