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Curr Environ Health Rep. 2016 Dec;3(4):416-433. doi: 10.1007/s40572-016-0117-9.

Environmental Metals and Cardiovascular Disease in Adults: A Systematic Review Beyond Lead and Cadmium.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
3
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 W 168th St, 11 Floor Rm 1105, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínico de Valencia, Avenida Blasco Ibañez, 17, 46010, Valencia, Spain.
5
Area of Cardiometabolic and Renal Risk, Institute for Biomedical Research Hospital Clinical of Valencia (INCLIVA), Av. Menendez Pelayo, 4 accesorio, 6010, Valencia, Spain.
6
CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Minister of Health, Madrid, Spain.
7
Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
8
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. maria.tellez@uv.es.
9
Area of Cardiometabolic and Renal Risk, Institute for Biomedical Research Hospital Clinical of Valencia (INCLIVA), Av. Menendez Pelayo, 4 accesorio, 6010, Valencia, Spain. maria.tellez@uv.es.

Abstract

Published systematic reviews concluded that there is moderate to strong evidence to infer a potential role of lead and cadmium, widespread environmental metals, as cardiovascular risk factors. For other non-essential metals, the evidence has not been appraised systematically. Our objective was to systematically review epidemiologic studies on the association between cardiovascular disease in adults and the environmental metals antimony, barium, chromium, nickel, tungsten, uranium, and vanadium. We identified a total of 4 articles on antimony, 1 on barium, 5 on chromium, 1 on nickel, 4 on tungsten, 1 on uranium, and 0 on vanadium. We concluded that the current evidence is not sufficient to inform on the cardiovascular role of these metals because of the small number of studies. Few experimental studies have also evaluated the role of these metals in cardiovascular outcomes. Additional epidemiologic and experimental studies, including prospective cohort studies, are needed to understand the role of metals, including exposure to metal mixtures, in cardiovascular disease development.

KEYWORDS:

Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular; Epidemiologic studies; Metals; Systematic review

PMID:
27783356
PMCID:
PMC5801549
DOI:
10.1007/s40572-016-0117-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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