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Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2017 Jan;126(1):54-60. Epub 2016 Oct 25.

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Secondary to Mild Head Trauma.

Author information

1
ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital, Pireaus, Greece dbalats@hotmail.com.
2
ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital, Pireaus, Greece.
3
ENT Department, Nicosia General Hospital, Nicosia, Cyprus.
4
ENT Department, General Hospital Asklepieio Voulas, Voula, Greece.
5
ENT Department, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We studied the clinical characteristics, nystagmographic findings, and treatment outcome of a group of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) secondary to mild head trauma and compared them with a group of patients with idiopathic BPPV.

METHODS:

The medical records of 33 patients with BPPV associated with mild head trauma were reviewed. Data of a complete otolaryngological, audiological, neurotologic, and imaging evaluation were available for all patients. Three hundred and twenty patients with idiopathic BPPV were used as a control group.

RESULTS:

The patients with BPPV secondary to mild head trauma presented the following features, in which they differed from the patients with idiopathic BPPV: (1) lower mean age, with more intense symptoms; (2) increased rate of horizontal and anterior semicircular canal involvement and frequent multiple canal and bilateral involvement; (3) greater incidence of canal paresis and presence of spontaneous nystagmus; (4) poorer treatment results, attributed mainly to coexisting canal paresis in many patients, and higher rate of recurrence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with mild head trauma differs from idiopathic BPPV in terms of several epidemiological and clinical features; it responds less effectively to treatment and is prone to recurrence.

KEYWORDS:

benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; canalith repositioning procedure; head trauma; hearing loss; nystagmography; vertigo

PMID:
27780909
DOI:
10.1177/0003489416674961
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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