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Microbes Infect. 2017 Mar;19(3):177-192. doi: 10.1016/j.micinf.2016.10.001. Epub 2016 Oct 22.

The bacillary and macrophage response to hypoxia in tuberculosis and the consequences for T cell antigen recognition.

Author information

1
Tuberculosis Research Section, Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD, 20892, United States.
2
Microbial Interface Biology, Priority Research Area Infections, Forschungszentrum Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences, Parkallee 1-40, D-23845, Borstel, Germany.
3
Microbial Interface Biology, Priority Research Area Infections, Forschungszentrum Borstel, Leibniz Center for Medicine and Biosciences, Parkallee 1-40, D-23845, Borstel, Germany; German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Site Hamburg-Borstel-Lübeck, Borstel, Germany.
4
Tuberculosis Research Section, Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD, 20892, United States; Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Initiative, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Observatory, 7925, South Africa.
5
Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Initiative, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Observatory, 7925, South Africa; The Francis Crick Institute, London, NW1 2AT, United Kingdom; Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom. Electronic address: r.j.wilkinson@imperial.ac.uk.
6
Clinical Infectious Diseases Research Initiative, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Observatory, 7925, South Africa; The Francis Crick Institute, London, NW1 2AT, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative anaerobe and its characteristic pathological hallmark, the granuloma, exhibits hypoxia in humans and in most experimental models. Thus the host and bacillary adaptation to hypoxia is of central importance in understanding pathogenesis and thereby to derive new drug treatments and vaccines.

KEYWORDS:

Antigens; Hypoxia; Lipid droplets; Macrophage; T cells; Tuberculosis

PMID:
27780773
PMCID:
PMC5335906
DOI:
10.1016/j.micinf.2016.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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