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Retin Cases Brief Rep. 2017 Winter;11 Suppl 1:S113-S120. doi: 10.1097/ICB.0000000000000442.

THE SPECTRUM OF AMALRIC TRIANGULAR CHOROIDAL INFARCTION.

Author information

1
*Retinal Disorders and Ophthalmic Genetics Division, Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; †Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; ‡Department of Ophthalmology, University of Lausanne, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland; §Department of Ophthalmology, Fribourg Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland; ¶Clinique de la Colline Hirslanden, Geneva, Switzerland; **Retina and Vitreous of Texas, Houston, Texas; and ††Greater Los Angeles VA Healthcare Center, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe the multimodal imaging findings, including optical coherence tomography angiography analysis, and spectrum of etiologies associated with Amalric triangular choroidal infarction.

METHODS:

This study is a multicenter, retrospective, observational case series review of the clinical and multimodal imaging findings for six patients with Amalric triangular choroidal infarction.

RESULTS:

Six patients (10 eyes) with Amalric triangular choroidal infarction were enrolled. Patients' ages ranged from 7 years to 90 years (mean 54 years, median 60 years). Wedge-shaped or triangular areas of choroidal ischemia were evident with fluorescein angiography in all patients and with indocyanine green angiography in one patient. Optical coherence tomography angiography demonstrated choriocapillaris flow reduction that colocalized with outer retinal structural abnormalities with en face optical coherence tomography and corresponded with the triangular zones of choroidal infarction identified with fluorescein angiography in one patient. Etiologies included giant cell arteritis in three cases: traumatic carotid dissection, traumatic retrobulbar hemorrhage, and malignant hypertension secondary to lupus-associated nephropathy.

CONCLUSION:

The Amalric triangular syndrome of choroidal infarction can occur as a result of a spectrum of etiologies, especially giant cell arteritis. Infarction is evident on traditional angiography in all cases. Optical coherence tomography angiography may provide a simple noninvasive tool to evaluate choroidal ischemia.

PMID:
27780182
DOI:
10.1097/ICB.0000000000000442
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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