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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2017 Feb;98(2):329-336. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.09.123. Epub 2016 Oct 21.

Changes in Resilience Predict Function in Adults With Physical Disabilities: A Longitudinal Study.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
2
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Electronic address: mjensen@uw.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

(1) To determine if resilience exhibits similar stability across time as depression, fatigue, and sleep quality; and (2) to determine if changes in resilience over a period of 1 year are associated with changes in depression, fatigue, sleep quality, and physical function over the same time period.

DESIGN:

Observational longitudinal survey study with measures administered 2 times, 1 year apart.

SETTING:

Community-based population sample.

PARTICIPANTS:

Adults with physical disabilities (N=893).

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Primary outcomes were measures of resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), fatigue (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System [PROMIS] Fatigue Short Form), sleep quality (PROMIS Sleep Disturbance), and physical function (8-item PROMIS Physical Functioning).

RESULTS:

Resilience (r=.71, P<.001) exhibited similar stability over 1 year to depression (r=.71, P<.001), fatigue (r=.79, P<.001), and sleep quality (r=.68, P<.001). A decrease in resilience was associated with an increase in depression (F1,885=70.23; P<.001; R2=.54) and fatigue (F1,885=25.66; P<.001; R2=.64), and an increase in resilience was associated with improved sleep quality (F1,885=30.76; P<.001; R2=.48) and physical function (F1,885=16.90; P<.001; R2=.86) over a period of 1 year, while controlling for age, sex, and diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Resilience exhibits similar test-retest stability as other important domains that are often treatment targets. Changes in resilience were associated with changes in depression, fatigue, sleep quality, and physical functioning over the course of 1 year. Further longitudinal and experimental research is warranted to investigate the potential causal effect of changes in resilience on quality of life in individuals with physical disabilities.

KEYWORDS:

Physiology; Quality of life; Rehabilitation

PMID:
27776921
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2016.09.123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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