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Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2016 Dec;136:196-203. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2016.10.009. Epub 2016 Oct 20.

Changes in corticospinal excitability during consolidation predict acute exercise-induced off-line gains in procedural memory.

Author information

1
School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y5, Canada; Memory and Motor Rehabilitation Laboratory (MEMORY-LAB), Feil and Oberfeld Research Centre, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Montreal Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation (CRIR), Laval, QC H7V 1R2, Canada.
2
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2200, Denmark.
3
School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y5, Canada; Memory and Motor Rehabilitation Laboratory (MEMORY-LAB), Feil and Oberfeld Research Centre, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Montreal Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation (CRIR), Laval, QC H7V 1R2, Canada. Electronic address: marc.roigpull@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

A single bout of cardiovascular exercise performed immediately after practicing a motor task improves the long-term retention of the skill through an optimization of memory consolidation. However, the specific brain mechanisms underlying the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on procedural memory are poorly understood. We sought to determine if a single bout of exercise modifies corticospinal excitability (CSE) during the early stages of memory consolidation. In addition, we investigated if changes in CSE are associated with exercise-induced off-line gains in procedural memory. Participants practiced a serial reaction time task followed by either a short bout of acute exercise or a similar rest period. To monitor changes in CSE we used transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to the primary motor cortex (M1) at baseline, 15, 35, 65 and 125min after exercise or rest. Participants in the exercise condition showed larger (∼24%) improvements in procedural memory through consolidation although differences between groups did not reach statistical significance. Exercise promoted an increase in CSE, which remained elevated 2h after exercise. More importantly, global increases in CSE following exercise correlated with the magnitude of off-line gains in skill level assessed in a retention test performed 8h after motor practice. A single bout of exercise modulates short-term neuroplasticity mechanisms subserving consolidation processes that predict off-line gains in procedural memory.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular exercise; Long-term potentiation; Motor evoked potentials; Motor memory; Transcranial magnetic stimulation

PMID:
27773595
DOI:
10.1016/j.nlm.2016.10.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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