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J Dairy Sci. 2016 Dec;99(12):9383-9394. doi: 10.3168/jds.2016-10930. Epub 2016 Oct 19.

Goat whey ameliorates intestinal inflammation on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Science and Food Technology, Federal University of Paraíba, 58051-900 Santa Rita, Brazil.
2
Department of Biophysics and Pharmacology, Biosciences Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-970 Natal, Brazil. Electronic address: gerlaneguerra@hotmail.com.
3
Department of Morphology, Histology and Basic Pathology, Biosciences Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-970 Natal, Brazil.
4
Department of Biophysics and Pharmacology, Biosciences Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, 59078-970 Natal, Brazil.
5
Department of Nutrition, Health Sciences Center, 58051-900 Santa Rita, Brazil.
6
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Paraíba, 58051-900 Santa Rita, Brazil.
7
School of Biotechnology, Catholic University of Portugal, 4202-401 Porto, Portugal.
8
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBER-EHD), Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (ibs.Granada), Center for Biomedical Research (CIBM), University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain.

Abstract

Complementary or alternative medicine is of great interest for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, with the aim of ameliorating the side effects of the drugs commonly used or improving their efficacy. In this study, we evaluated the ability of goat whey to prevent intestinal inflammation in the experimental model of acetic acid-induced rats and compared it to sulfasalazine. Pretreatment with goat whey (1, 2, and 4g/kg) and sulfasalazine (250mg/kg) on colitic rats improved colonic inflammatory markers, including myeloperoxidase activity, leukotriene B4 levels, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, the administration of goat whey significantly reduced the colonic oxidative stress by reducing malondialdehyde levels and increased total glutathione content, a potent antioxidant peptide. The histological evaluation of the colonic specimens from colitic rats confirmed these beneficial effects, as goat whey preserved the colonic tissue, especially in those rats treated with the highest dose of goat whey or with sulfasalazine. The immunohistochemistry analysis of the colonic tissue evaluation also revealed a reduction in the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, together with an increased expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1. These results suggest that goat whey exerted a preventive effect against the intestinal damage induced by acetic acid, showing a similar efficacy to that shown by sulfasalazine, therefore making it a potential treatment for human inflammatory bowel disease.

KEYWORDS:

cytokines; goat whey; immunohistochemical; intestinal inflammation; oxidative stress

PMID:
27771081
DOI:
10.3168/jds.2016-10930
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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