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Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 2017 Jan 1;70(Pt 1):272-277. doi: 10.1016/j.msec.2016.08.066. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Concentrated polymer brush-modified silica particle coating confers biofouling-resistance on modified materials.

Author information

1
WPI Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan. Electronic address: YOSHIKAWA.Chiaki@nims.go.jp.
2
DSM Ahead/TS, 6167 RD Geleen, Netherlands.
3
WPI Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan.
4
WPI Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan; Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan.
5
DSM Biomedical, 6167 RD Geleen, Netherlands. Electronic address: edith.bosch-van-den@dsm.com.

Abstract

Biofouling, an undesired adsorption of biological material to otherwise inert surfaces, is detrimental in medical, pharmaceutical, and other sectors. Concentrated polymer brushes (CPB) confer non-biofouling properties on modified surfaces but are cumbersome to fabricate. Here, a simple and versatile method of fabricating non-biofouling coatings for various substrates was developed using CPB-modified silica nanoparticles (SiPs). Concentrated poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PPEGMA) brushes were grafted on SiPs by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. CPB-SiPs were spin-coated onto silicon wafers or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor chips with phenyl azido cross-linkers. SiP cross-linking was then performed by ultra violet irradiation for 20s, or by heating at 120°C for 12h. Protein adsorption to coatings was studied by QCM approach and human umbilical vein endothelial cell adhesion to coatings was examined. SiP to cross-linker weight ratios were varied from 2.0/0.5 to 9.0/0.5 (wt/wt%) and the coatings almost completely suppressed protein adsorption and cell adhesion to treated surfaces. The coating was also applied to polymeric films, rendering these materials biofouling-resistant.

KEYWORDS:

Atom transfer radical polymerization; Cell adhesion; Concentrated polymer brush; Protein adsorption; Silica nanoparticles; Surface modification

PMID:
27770891
DOI:
10.1016/j.msec.2016.08.066
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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