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Gait Posture. 2017 Jan;51:153-158. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.10.008. Epub 2016 Oct 13.

Correcting waveform bias using principal component analysis: Applications in multicentre motion analysis studies.

Author information

1
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University, 130 Stuart St., Kingston, ON, Canada. Electronic address: allison.clouthier@queensu.ca.
2
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook St., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Electronic address: ebohm@cjrg.ca.
3
Department of Surgery, Queen's University, 76 Stuart St., Kingston, ON, Canada. Electronic address: rudanj@kgh.kari.net.
4
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Manitoba, 771 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Electronic address: barbara.shay@umanitoba.ca.
5
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University, 130 Stuart St., Kingston, ON, Canada. Electronic address: michael.rainbow@queensu.ca.
6
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University, 130 Stuart St., Kingston, ON, Canada. Electronic address: kevin.deluzio@queensu.ca.

Abstract

Multicentre studies are rare in three dimensional motion analyses due to challenges associated with combining waveform data from different centres. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a statistical technique that can be used to quantify variability in waveform data and identify group differences. A correction technique based on PCA is proposed that can be used in post processing to remove nuisance variation introduced by the differences between centres. Using this technique, the waveform bias that exists between the two datasets is corrected such that the means agree. No information is lost in the individual datasets, but the overall variability in the combined data is reduced. The correction is demonstrated on gait kinematics with synthesized crosstalk and on gait data from knee arthroplasty patients collected in two centres. The induced crosstalk was successfully removed from the knee joint angle data. In the second example, the removal of the nuisance variation due to the multicentre data collection allowed significant differences in implant type to be identified. This PCA-based technique can be used to correct for differences between waveform datasets in post processing and has the potential to enable multicentre motion analysis studies.

KEYWORDS:

Gait; Inter-laboratory; Motion analysis; Principal component analysis; Waveform data

PMID:
27770680
DOI:
10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.10.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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