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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2016 Dec 1;169:41-47. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.10.008. Epub 2016 Oct 15.

Prevalence and correlates of "Vaping" as a route of cannabis administration in medical cannabis patients.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Rachel Upjohn Building, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2700, United States. Electronic address: jcranfor@med.umich.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Rachel Upjohn Building, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2700, United States; VA Center for Clinical Management Research (CCMR), Veterans Health Administration, 2215 Fuller Road, Mail Stop 152, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, United States.
3
School of Social Work, University of Michigan, 1080S University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Rachel Upjohn Building, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2700, United States.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To examine the prevalence and correlates of vaporization (i.e., "vaping") as a route of cannabis administration in a sample of medical cannabis patients.

PROCEDURES:

Adults ages 21 and older (N=1485M age=45.1) who were seeking medical cannabis certification (either for the first time or as a renewal) at medical cannabis clinics in southern Michigan completed a screening assessment. Participants completed measures of route of cannabis administration, cannabis use, alcohol and other substance use.

FINDINGS:

An estimated 39% (n=511) of the sample reported past-month cannabis vaping, but vaping as the sole route of cannabis administration was rare. Specifically, only 30 participants (2.3% of the full sample and 5.9% of those who reported any vaping) indicated vaping as the sole route of cannabis administration. The majority (87.3%) of those who reported vaping also reported smoking (combustion) as a route of cannabis administration. Being younger than age 44, having more than a high school education, engaging in nonmedical stimulant use, being a returning medical cannabis patient, and greater frequency of cannabis use were associated with higher odds of vaping at the bivariate level and with all variables considered simultaneously.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vaping appears to be relatively common among medical cannabis patients, but is seldom used as the sole route of cannabis administration.

RESULTS:

highlight the importance of monitoring trends in vaping and other substance use behaviors in this population and underscore the need for longitudinal research into the motives, correlates, and consequences of cannabis vaping in medical cannabis patients.

KEYWORDS:

Correlates of cannabis vaping; Medical cannabis; Route of cannabis administration; Vaping

PMID:
27770657
PMCID:
PMC5140730
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.10.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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