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Trends Parasitol. 2017 Jan;33(1):21-29. doi: 10.1016/j.pt.2016.09.010. Epub 2016 Oct 17.

Might Interspecific Interactions between Pathogens Drive Host Evolution? The Case of Plasmodium Species and Duffy-Negativity in Human Populations.

Author information

1
IRD, UMMISCO (UMI IRD/UPMC 209), 32, Avenue Henry Varagnat, 93143 Bondy Cedex France; CNRS, MIVEGEC (UMR CNRS/IRD/UM), 911 Ave. Agropolis, BP 64501, FR-34394 Montpellier cedex 5 France. Electronic address: benjamin.roche@ird.fr.
2
CNRS, MIVEGEC (UMR CNRS/IRD/UM), 911 Ave. Agropolis, BP 64501, FR-34394 Montpellier cedex 5 France.
3
Unit of Human Evolutionary Genetics, (CNRS URA3012 Institut Pasteur) 25, rue du Dr Roux 75724 Paris Cedex 15 France.
4
IRD, UMMISCO (UMI IRD/UPMC 209), 32, Avenue Henry Varagnat, 93143 Bondy Cedex France; CNRS, MIVEGEC (UMR CNRS/IRD/UM), 911 Ave. Agropolis, BP 64501, FR-34394 Montpellier cedex 5 France.

Abstract

Malarial infections have long been recognized as a driver of human evolution, as demonstrated by the influence of Plasmodium falciparum on sickle-cell anemia persistence. Duffy-negativity is another blood disorder thought to have been selected because it confers nearly complete resistance against Plasmodium vivax infection. Recent evidence suggests that the benefits of being Duffy-negative cannot be expected to play a strong selective pressure on humans, whereas its costs cannot be considered as negligible. Here, we suggest that the cross-talk between P. falciparum and P. vivax in coinfected children could represent the most parsimonious explanation of the frequency of Duffy-negativity. We discuss how this new hypothesis could be tested and call for a reconsideration of the evolution of the Duffy-negative group.

PMID:
27765439
DOI:
10.1016/j.pt.2016.09.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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