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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2016 Dec;122:17-27. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2016.09.022. Epub 2016 Oct 1.

High serum oxytocin is associated with metabolic syndrome in older men - The MINOS study.

Author information

1
INSERM UMR 1033, University of Lyon, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France. Electronic address: pawel.szulc@inserm.fr.
2
CNRS, iBV UMR 7277, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose Nice, France; INSERM, iBV, U1091, Nice, France.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Medical Biology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.
4
Nice University Hospital, Saint Roch Hospital, Department of Hormonology, Nice, France.
5
Nice University Hospital, Cimiez Hospital, Department of Clinical Research, Nice, France.
6
Dept. of Public Health, University of Lyon, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.
7
INSERM UMR 1033, University of Lyon, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.
8
Nice University Hospital, Pasteur Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Nice, France; UMR E-4320 MATOs CEA/iBEB/SBTN, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, Faculté de Médecine, Nice, France.

Abstract

AIM:

Oxytocin regulates food intake, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and urinary sodium excretion. We assessed the association between serum oxytocin levels and presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in older men.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional study was performed in 540 volunteer men aged 50-85yrs from the MINOS cohort. Oxytocin was measured in fasting serum by radioimmunoassay (Oxytocin RIA, Phoenix Pharmaceuticals). MetS was diagnosed using the harmonized definition.

RESULTS:

Serum oxytocin was higher in 166 men with MetS vs. controls (p<0.005). After adjustment for confounders including leptin, higher oxytocin was associated with higher odds of MetS (OR=1.38 per SD, 95%CI: 1.10-1.71, p<0.005). Men with serum oxytocin >0.74pg/mL (median) had higher odds of MetS vs. men with oxytocin ⩽0.74pg/mL (OR=2.06, 95%CI: 1.33-3.18, p<0.005). Higher oxytocin levels and low testosterone levels (total or free) were significantly associated with higher odds of MetS jointly and independently of each other. Men having oxytocin >0.74pg/mL and total testosterone <300ng/dL (<10.4nmol/L) had higher odds of MetS vs. men without these characteristics (OR=3.95, 95%CI: 1.65-9.46, p<0.005). Men having 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels <30ng/mL and oxytocin >0.74pg/mL had higher odds of MetS vs. men without these characteristics (OR=2.86, 95%CI: 1.47-5.58, p<0.01). Men having oxytocin >0.74pg/mL and osteocalcin levels <14.6ng/mL (lowest quartile) had higher odds of MetS vs. men without these characteristics (OR=4.12, 95%CI: 2.07-8.20, p<0.001).

CONCLUSION:

In older men, higher serum oxytocin levels are associated with higher odds of MetS regardless of potential confounders.

KEYWORDS:

Abdominal obesity; Men; Metabolic syndrome; Oxytocin

PMID:
27764720
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2016.09.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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